Search Results for: rights issue

A quick look at the Unicredit (deeply discounted) rights issue

The rights issue

Those who have been reading the blog long enough might remember that Italy in general is a good hunting ground for “interesting” deeply discounted rights issues and especially Unicredit rights issues in the past were very interesting experiences.

So roughly 4 years later, Unicredit has launched another rights issue. Ex date for the subscription right has been Monday, February 6th.

The conditions were as follows:

  • 13 new shares for 5 existing ones
  • a subscription price of 8,09 EUR
  • total volume 13 bn EUR (!!!)
  • subscription rights trade under the ticker UCGAZ

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Groundhog day: Another BMPS (ISIN IT0005092165) deeply discounted rights issue “Italian style”

Health warning: Do not try to trade in such situations unless you know exactly what you are doing. This is not investment advise, do your own research.

Almost exactly 1 year ago, I already looked at last year’s deeply discounted rights issue of struggling Italian Bank BMPS. Well, the same time in the year again and of course, BMPS is again in the market…. somehow this reminds me of this great movie:
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Deeply discounted rights issues – Serco Plc (ISIN GB0007973794)

Serco Plc, the British outsourcing company, used ro be a stock market favourite for a long time. Especially in the 2000s, Serco was able to increase its profit ~10 fold from 0,04 pence per share in 1999 to around 40 pence in 2012.

Then however, a little bit similar to Royal Imtech, problems and some scandals piled up and culminated in an accounting bloodbath for 2014. Serco showed a total loss of 2,09 pounds (!!) per share, eliminating pretty much all profits made from 1999.

After raising a smaller amount of capital last year, Serco announced a large 1:1 capital increase at a sharp discount in early March, the rights have been split of on March 31st. Serco wants to raise some 500 mn GBP with the majority being used to lower the outstanding debt (currently around 600-700 mn).

Looking at the stock chart, Serco shareholders have suffered a big loss, especially compared to competitor G4S which, despite relatively similar problems, has recovered well:

Normally, I would not look at a “turn around” case like Serco at all, but in this case it might be different. The difference is the new CEO, Ex Aggreko CEO Rupert Soames:

Soames surprised everyone in early 2014 when he left Aggreko after leading the company for 11 years and with great success. For anyone who has read an Aggreko annual report, one knows that Soames was not only a succesful CEO but also a very good communicator. I can highly recommend to read those reports as they are very interesting.

Before asking for shareholder money, he actually said that he will not take his guaranteed bonus for 2014 which I found was a very good gesture.

After enjoying the Aggreko reports I decided to look into the 2014 annual report and especially the “CEO Letter” from Soames to see what he has to say.

I was positively surprised by the openness how Serco’s problems were adressed, both from the Chairman and Soames himself. It is the classic tale of too much growth through acquisitions combined with a lack of integration and bad execution. Other than at Royal Imtech, it doesn’t involve outright accounting fraud.

One rarely gets to read such a good description of the problems of a company and the historic context (page 9 of a turnaround case. This is then followed by a clear change in strategy, namely to focus on Government services and get out of “private” contracts altogether. Overall the strategy section looked very well thought out and not unrealistic to me.

Further in the report, I found this interesting statement:

Historically, the key metrics used in forecasts were non-GAAP measures of Adjusted Revenue (adjusted to include Serco’s share of joint venture revenue) and Adjusted Operating Profit (adjusted to exclude Serco’s share of joint venture interest and tax as well as removing transaction-related costs and other material costs estimated by management that were considered to have been impacted by the UK Government reviews that followed the issues on the EM and PECS contracts). We believe that in the future the Group should report its results (and provide its future guidance) on metrics that are more closely aligned to statutory measures. Accordingly, our outlook for 2015 is now expressed in terms of Revenue and Trading Profit. The revenue measure is consistent with the IFRS definition, and therefore excludes Serco’s share of joint venture revenue. Trading Profit, which is otherwise consistent with the IFRS definition of operating profit,adjusts only to exclude amortisation and impairment of intangibles arising on acquisition, as well as exceptional items. Trading Profit is therefore lower han the previously defined Adjusted Operating Profit measure due to the inclusion of Serco’s share of joint venture interest and tax charges. We believe that reporting and forecasting using metrics that are consistent with IFRS will be simpler and more transparent, and therefore more helpful to investors.

This is something whcih I haven’t seen before that actually a company is going back from “adjusted” reporting to statutory which I find is very positive.

Another good part can be found later in the statement from the CFO (by the way another Aggreko veteran) regarding the implementation of ROIC:

A new measure of pre-tax return on invested capital (ROIC) has been introduced in 2014 to measure how efficiently the Group uses its capital in terms of the return it generates from its assets. Pre-tax ROIC is calculated as Trading Profit divided by the Invested Capital balance. Invested Capital represents the assets and liabilities considered to be deployed in delivering the trading performance of the business.

I always like to see return on capital as an important measurement for businesses and implementing this is clearly a great step forward.

Another interesting fact from the Renumeration report: Both new board members have significantly lower salaries than the old, outgoing board members. Soames has a 800 k base salary, Cockburn 500 k. both pretty reasonable numbers.

However the big problem for me is that I know next to nothing about the business of Government outsourcing. So for me it is at this time very difficult to assess how attractive the stock is and how long it will take to recover.

The current management is clearly a good one but I am not sure if the underlying business is a good one as well. Especially those long-term contracts do seem to contain significant risks. Page 50 and following pages in the report provides  a very good view in great on what can go wrong with long dated contracts. In many cases, Serco was locked into fix price contracts and costs went against them without having a chance to do anything about it.

On the other hand, the 1,5 bn write-off for sure is conservative and one could/should expect that it contains some “reserves” which might be released in coming years.

Deeply discounted rights issues in general

Another word of caution here: A couple of discounted rights issues I looked at in the past were actually not very good investments.

Severfield was a good one with around +50% outperformance against the Footsie since the rights issue in March 2013. KPN even outperformed the Dutch Index by ~+62% in the two years and Unicredit even more than 70%.

On the other hand, Monte di Pasci underperformed by -70% against the index since their rights issue  and Royal Imtech by -45%. EMAK finally performed more or less in line with the index over time after the capital increase.

So overall, the score of outperformers to underperformers would be 3,5:2,5. With Royal Imtech it was pretty easy to see that it would be difficult, as there was a significant accounting fraud involved. BMPS also looked like a big problem as the rights issue was to small and another one is in the making.

So the question is clearly: Is Serco more like Severfield/KPN or Royal Imtech ? For the time being I would rather look at Serco more positively, mostly due to management.

Not surprisingly, analysts hate Serco. the company has one of the lowest consensus ratings within the Stoxx 600. This alone is not a reason to buy, but at least might explain a potential under valuation. A final note: Soames might not be a bad choice for running a Government outsourcing company. His ancestry should ensure some viable contacts at government level:

Rupert Soames can just remember his grandfather, Sir Winston Churchill. His earliest memories are of playing cowboys and Indians with Britain’s wartime prime minister – and of not being allowed to attend his state funeral. He was six at the time and furious: “Watching it on TV was a very poor substitute,” he once said.

His family has long been part of the political establishment: his father Christopher was the last governor of southern Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe, who served in Margaret Thatcher’s cabinet and was also a European commissioner, while his brother Nicholas is a current Tory MP.

Summary:

Overall, the Serco case does look interesting. A brilliant management team is trying to turn around a troubled Government contractor with a transparent and plausible strategy. On the other hand, the business is a difficult one or at least I do not have a lot of knowledge about this sector so I need to digg more into it.

So for the time being, I will watch this from the sidelines and maybe try to learn more about this sector in general.

The Dutch Job: Royal Imtech (NL0006055329) Deeply discounted rights issue – The “short opportunity of the century”

I had written about Royal Imtech, the troubled Dutch service company already a couple of times. The short story: Growth star encounters fraud and too much debt.

Somehow, I lost them from my radar screen until today. Already in August, they announced that they will do another rights issue, this time aiming for 600 mn EUR, after having raised 500 mn in 2013.

The funny thing is the way they actually do this which even puts my favourite “Italian Job” companies at shame:

Following the approval granted by the General Meeting on 7 October 2014, Royal Imtech N.V. (“Royal Imtech” or the “Company”) announces a 131 for 1 fully underwritten rights offering of 60,082,154,924 new ordinary shares with a nominal value of EUR 0.01 each (the “Offer Shares”) at an issue price of EUR 0.01 per Offer Share (the “Issue Price”). For this purpose, and subject to applicable securities laws and the terms of the prospectus dated 8 October 2014 (the “Prospectus”), existing holders of ordinary shares in the share capital of Royal Imtech (“Ordinary Shares”) as at 17:40 CEST on 8 October 2014 (the “Record Date”) are being granted transferable subscription rights (“Rights”) pro rata to their existing shareholdings (the “Rights Offering”, and together with the Rump Offering (as defined below) the “Offering”). No Rights will be granted to Royal Imtech as a holder of Ordinary Shares in its own capital. The Rights will entitle the holders thereof, provided they are Eligible Persons, to subscribe for 131 Offer Shares for every Right held at the Issue Price, subject to applicable securities laws and in accordance with the terms and subject to the conditions set out in the Prospectus. The Issue Price per Offer Share represents a discount of approximately 21.7% to the theoretical ex-rights price (“TERP”) based on the share price of EUR 0.3763 at Euronext in Amsterdam (“Euronext Amsterdam”) after close of business on 7 October 2014 and 458,642,404 shares issued and outstanding at the same date (thus excluding treasury shares

So before the rights issue, the market value of the company was around 0,38*458 mn shares= 175 mn EUR. Today is the first day where Royal Imtech trades “ex rights”. Just as a little refresher the formula for calculating the value of the right (to buy 131 shares at 0,01 EUR) before trading:

(0,3763-0,01)*131/132= 0,3635

So theoretically the price of Royal Imtech should be today: 0.3763-0.3635 = 0,0128 EUR. a little more than one cent.

Let’s look what the shareprice is doing today:

Imtech is trading at 0,09 EUR, around 800% higher where it should trade !!!!! On the other hand, the rights trade only at 0,17 EUR at the time of writing, a discount of 50% to the theoretical value (as of yesterday).

This leaves the question: Why are investors paying today 9 cents for the shares which they can buy via the rights at a little over 1 cents per share in 2 weeks time ? I have no answer. MAybe people (and computers) mixed up the decimals and think the new shares come at 0,10 EUR ?

Anyway, if anyone is able to short Royal Imtech at this level, this would be the short of the century. You can short something at 0,09 EUR today and buy back at 0,01 in a few days. Nothing more to say….

Edit: Might be a good example for any student who is confronted with the “Efficienty markets hypothesis”.

Banca Monte dei Paschi Siena (BMPS)- Another deeply discounted rights issue “Italo style”

Capital Raising in Italy is always worth looking into. Not always as an investment, but almost always in order to see interesting and unusal things. I didn’t have BMPS on my active radar screen, but reader Benny_m pointed out this interesting situation.

Banca Monte dei Paschi Siena, the over 600 year old Italian bank has been in trouble for quite some time. After receiving a government bailout, they were forced to do a large capital increase which they priced in the beginning of last week.

The big problem was that they have to issue 5 bn EUR based on a market cap of around 2,9 bn.

After a reverse 1:10 share split in April, BMPS shares traded at around 25 EUR before the announcement. In true “Italian job” style, BMPS did a subscription rights issue with 214 new shares per 5 old shares at 1 EUR per share, in theory a discount of more than 95%.

The intention here was relatively clear: The large discount should lead to a “valuable” subscription right which should prevent the market from just letting the subscription right expire. What one often sees, such as in the Unicredit case is the following:

– the old investors sell partly already before the capital increase in order to raise some cash for the new shares
– within the subscription right trading period, there will be pressure on the subscription right price as many investors will try to do a “operation blanche”, meaning seling enough subscription rights to fund the exercise of the remaininng rights. This often results in a certain discount for the subscription rights

In BMPS’s case, the first strange thing ist the price of the underlying stock:

BMPS IM Equity (Banca Monte dei  2014-06-16 13-51-34

Adjusted for the subscription right, the stock gained more than 20% since the start of the subscription right trading period and it didn’t drop before, quite in contrast, the stock is up ~80% YTD. As a result of course, the subscription right should increase in value. But this is how the subscription rights have performed since they started trading:

MPSAXA IM Equity (Banca Monte de 2014-06-16 13-59-10

It is not unusual that the subscription rights trade at a certain discount, as the “arbitrage deal”, shorting stocks and going long the subscription right is not always easy to implement.

At the current price however, the discount is enormous::

At 1,95 EUR per share, the subscription right should be worth (214/5)* (1,95-1,00)= 40,66 EUR against the current price of 18 EUR, a discount of more than 50%. The most I have seen so far was 10-15%. So is this the best arbitrage situation of the century ?

Not so fast.

First, it seems not to be possible to short the shares, at least not for retail investors. Secondly, different to other subscription right situations, the subscription right are trading extremely liquid. Since the start of trading on June 9th, around 560 mn EUR in subscription rights have been traded, roughly twice the value of the ordinary shares. The trading in the ordinary shares themselves however is also intersting, trading volume since June 9th has been higher than the market cap.

Thirdly, for a retail investors, the banks ususally require a very early notice of exercise. So one cannot wait until the trading period and decide if to exercise or not, some banks require 1 week advance notice or more. My own bank, Consors told me that I would need to advice them until June 19th 10 AM, which is pretty OK but prevents me from buying on the last day.

In general, in such a situation like this the question would be: What is the mispriced asset, the subscription right or the shares themselves ? Coming from the subscription right perspective, the implicit share price would be 1+ (18/((214/5)*1,95-1)))= 1,44 EUR. This is roughly where BMPS traded a week before the capital increase.

For me it is pretty hard to say which is now the “fair” price, the traded stock price at 1,95, the implict price from the rights at 1,44 or somewhere in between. As the rights almost always trade at a discount, even in non-Italian cases, one could argue that there might be some 10-15% upside in buying the shares via the rights. On the other hand, I find the Italian stock market rather overheated at the moment and the outstanding BMPS shares are quite easy to manipulate higher due to the low market cap of the “rump shares” at around 200-250 mn EUR.

The “sure thing” would be to short the Stock at 1,96 EUR, but that doens’t seem to be possible.

Summary:

Again, this “Italian right” capital raising creates a unique situation, this time with a price for the subscription right totally disconnected from the share price.

Nevertheless I am not quite sure at the moment what to to with this. One strategy would be to buy the subscription right now and then sell the new shares as quickly as possible, but it looks like that this is exactly what the “masterminds” behind this deal have actually want investors to do. They don’t care about the share price, they just want to bring in 5 bn EUR in fresh money and an ultra cheap subscription right is the best way to ensure an exercise. In this case we should expect a significant drop in the share price once the new shares become tradable. So for the time being am sitting on the sidelines and watch this with (great) interest as it is hard for me to “handicap” this special situation at the moment.

Prime Office AG (DE000PRME020) – Strange rights issue

I have linked to the “special situation” stock Prime Office already in the past. The story in short:

Oaktree has effectively taken over a struggling German Office Reit by contributing a portfolio of office assets of their own. They then changed the status from REIT to “normal” company. In order to reduce the debt level, they started a rights issue a few days ago.

However this rights issue has a strange twist: Although the subscription rights are already traded (ISIN DE000PRME1B7), they did not publish the subscription price of the new shares yet.

Just as a reminder, let’s look how the value of a subscription right is calculated (from Stockopedia)

The calculated value of a subscription right. The theoretical value of a right during the cum rights period – which is the interval after the announcement of the rights offering but before the stock trades on an ex-rights basis – is calculated by the formula:

(Stock Price – Rights subscription price per share) / # of rights required to buy one share + 1

What we do know is that there will be 8 new shares for 23 old shares, that they are offering (up to) 46.58829 mn shares and that they want to raise 130 mn EUR. So one could calculate a theoretical subsrciption price of (130/46.59) = 2.70 and a value of the subscription right at the time of writing of (2.81-2.70)/(23/8+1)= 0.0283 EUR which is silghly lower than the traded prcie of 0.031 EUR per right.

But what I am asking myself is the following: Why did they do this in such a strange way ? Why didn’t they fix the price in the beginning as in very rights issue I have seen up to now ? I have no idea but I will watch that one closely.

KPN rights issue: Final terms

I have covered KPN as a potential “deeply discounted risghts issue” special situation in the past.

Today, KPN announced the final terms for their rights issue (bold marks mine):

2 for 1 rights issue of 2,838,732,182 new ordinary shares at an issue price of EUR 1.06 for each ordinary share
• Issue price represents a 35.1% discount to the theoretical ex-rights price, based on the closing price of KPN’s ordinary shares on NYSE Euronext in Amsterdam at 24 April 2013
AMX has committed to subscribe for the Rights pro rata to its current participation in the issued share capital (excluding treasury shares) of 29.77%
Record Date for Offering is set at 25 April 2013 at 5.40 pm CET
Exercise Period runs from 9.00 am CET on 26 April 2013 until 3.00 pm CET on 14 May 2013• Rump Offering (if any) is expected to take place on 15 May 2013

What I find very remarkable is that there is only a very short time period between announcement of the terms and the start of the trading of the rights. Basically they announced today and trading starts tomorrow.

For the portfolio, I will start with a 1% investment as a rather “short term” special situation based on current prices of around 2.61 EUR per share. Lets wait and see how that one works out.

Severfield-Rowen – Follow up deeply discounted rights issue

A few days ago, I mentioned UK based Severfield Rowen as a potential interesting “deeply discounted rights issue” special situation.

Problem is that I don’t know much about the company. So the problem is always: How do you start looking at a new company ?

That’s when I remembered a very good post of Geoff Gannnon a few days ago:

:
I recently mentioned something in an email that I’m not sure I’ve said before on this blog. I always read the newest and oldest 10-K for a company when I start analyzing it. Reading the oldest 10-K gives you perspective.

I have to confess that normally I would start with the latest report and then work my way back, but the approach of Geoff really makes a lot of intuitive sense to me. So why not try with Severfield-Rowen ?.

The oldest annual report to be found on S-R homepage is the one from 2000.

So let’s compare some key figures from 2000 against 2011:

The difference couldn’t be bigger. In 1999/2000 we have a completely unlevered company with OK margins but very nice ROE/ROCE because of a quite efficient capital/sales ratio.

The 2011 company however looks very different. Sales have doubled, but lower margins, significant goodwill and debt including a growing pension liability reduce ROE/ROCE into low single digits.

So what happened in between ? Well of course, acquisitions:

2005: Acquisition of Atlas Ward, however this looked like rather a small fish at a bargain price

But then the big bummer:

2007: Acquisition of Fisher Engineering for a whopping 90 mn GBP

Fisher Engineering seemed to have been a Northern Ireland based company at least, the seemed to have paid partly in new shares according to this article:

Severfield-Rowen has agreed to buy AML for a total consideration of approximately £90m, of which £36.6m will be satisfied by the issue of 1,750,000 new shares at approximately 2,089 pence each with the balance in cash.

The rational given now f course sounds like a big joke, but at that time Ireland was still “hot” (for another 6 months or so:

The Fisher acquisition will extend Severfield-Rowen’s leading market position in the UK and give Severfield-Rowen a stronger presence in the growing Irish steel fabrication market.

In 2010 finally, they started a JV in India, but more on that later.

SO let’s look at 2006 vs. 2007 :

We can see in 2006 a very very healthy company with lots of net cash on the balance sheet, no goodwill nothing. In 2007, profits still went up but didn’t really compensate for the increased invested capital.

Interestingly, 2008 and 2009 were quire ok, however in 2010 S-R was hit by the “Wile E. Coyote” moment:

I spare myself the details, but i think this table is quite telling:

2007 2008 2009 2010
United Kingdom 289.6 314.6 325.4 260.5
Republic of Ireland and mainland Europe 8.9 79.5 23.2 3.6
Other countries 0.9 2 0.8 2.5

The access to the “Fast growing Irish market” for which they paid 90 mn GBP in 2007 had completely “vaporized” in 2010. I have to confess that this seems to be one of the worst timed acquisitions I have seen in my life.

interestingly enough, the still carry proudly the whole acquisition goodwill on their balance sheet. I wonder how the auditors sign this on a subsidiary without sales ?

The rights issue

Propectuses for rights issues are a very good ssource of information, the one from S-r is no exception.

Especially the following paragraph makes clear, how severe the problems are:

Severfield-Rowen will be in breach of one or more covenants under the Existing Facilities on 18 March 2013, being the date of the General Meeting. A breach of any one of such covenants would be an event of default under the Existing Facilities entitling the Group’s lenders to demand immediate repayment of all outstanding amounts and cancel the facilities. As at 14 February 2013 the Group had net financial indebtedness of £44.0 million. In the event that Shareholders’ do not vote in favour of the Resolution and the Group’s lenders demanded repayment of all outstanding amounts and cancelled the Existing Facilities on 18 March 2013, the Group would have insufficient funds to repay the amounts outstanding. The Group would then immediately need to find alternative sources of funds to replace the funds that would have been made available pursuant to the Rights Issue and the Revised Facilities. The actions that the Group would then seek to take to make up the shortfall in its funding requirements (which the Directors believe would need to be pursued simultaneously and immediately), include seeking to negotiate a new facility agreement with its lenders; seeking to obtain a sufficient amount of alternative funding from other sources; seeking to dispose of some or all of its assets or businesses; and/or seeking to find a purchaser of the entire Group. The Directors are not confident that any of the above actions will be achievable. In the event that the alternative courses of action set out above fail, the Group
ultimately may have to cease trading at that time. As a result, Shareholders could lose their investment in the Company.

So it is pretty clear: A failure to get the rights issue approved will lead to a direct insolvency of the company.

Quick valuation exercise

We have seen that the business of S-R is clearly very cyclical. At the moment, the UK and S-R are clearly at a low part of the cycle. Also, years like 2006 and 2007 will not be repeated any time soon.

Over the full 1999-2012 cycle, S-R has an average net margin of 3.7%. The exactly same average is the result of the “Normal” years, taking out 2007-2009 and 2012.

So if S-R gets back to ~300 mn GBP sales, that could result in 11.1 mn GBP normalized earnings. After the capital increase,S-R will have 290 mn shares outstanding. This results ~ 3.7 cents normalized earnings per share or a “fair value per share” after the capital increase of around 37 pence.

In order to make this interesting, the price should be definitely cheaper than that, so I would only buy below 25 pence or so.

Stock price

The rights have been split of on Tue, March 19th. The stocks are trading now around 0,37 GBP

Summary:

Looking at Severfiled-Rowen in 1999 and 2011 is like looking at two different companies. Especially the misguided acquisition in 2007 lead the company in deep trouble. However, despite the very significant decrease in the share price, S-R is still not a real bargain due to the massive dilution of the rights issue.

Only if one believes in a short term recovery of the UK economy, S-R would be a “buy” right now. So for the time being “no action”.

Deeply disounted rights issue watchlist: Severfield-Rowen Plc (ISIN GB00B27YGJ97)

UK based Severfield-Rowen is according to Bloomberg

Severfield-Rowen plc is an engineering and construction company. The Company designs, fabricates and erects structural steelwork, specialist claddings, and ancillary products. The Company also manufactures and markets a range of equipment for the meat and poultry processing industry through the subsidiary Manabo Limited. Severfield-Rowen operates primarily in the United Kingdom.

S-R came out in November with a profit warning, estimating Pre Tax profits of ~ 1mn GPB

By James Amott
Nov. 5 (Bloomberg) — Pricing pressure, protracted contractual settlements posing significant challenges, co. says in statement.
• Performances of U.K. businesses mixed
• FY pretax profit likely to be ~GBP1m
• Co. confident revamp will improve performance

Then, a little bit like in the Imtech case, the news got worse in January:

By Nadine Skoczylas
Jan. 23 (Bloomberg) — Severfield-Rowen says U.K. performance, further, “and materially,” hurt by cost overruns on 122 Leadenhall contract.
• Board intends to review current contract base, will provide update to mkt as soon as possible
• “In light of these recent developments,” board concluded that change of leadership needed to “re-establish confidence” with stakeholders
• CEO Tom Haughey standing down, leaving board with immediate effect
• Chairman John Dodds will assume role of CEO until new chief found; board “actively engaged” in search

Of course, after the CEO departure some more issues were identified and again, similar to Imtech, a capital raising was more or less dictated by the banks.

Last week then, Severfield came out with the preliminary 2012 numbers (Loss of 18.2 mn GBP) and the details of a deeply discounted rights issue.

At a current market cap of 70 mn GBPs, Severfield wants to raise ~50 mn GBP. In order to guarantee success (and to please the underwriting banks), they will issue new shares under the following conditions:

– 7 new shares for 3 old ones
– issue price 0.23 GBP (against 0.79 current price), so a discount of almost 70% !!
– the “ex date” for the subscription rights is March 19th, trading of the subscription rights will happen from March 19th to April 4th

The value of one subscription right should be at current prices:

(0.79-0.23)/((3/7)+1)=0.39 per share/subscription right.

Clearly, shareholders are not big fans of large capital increases.

The shareholders are the “who is who” of UK fund managers, the biggest are:

Prudential 13.4%
M&G 12.7%
Jo Hambro 11.3%
Aviva 10.1%
Threadneedle 6.7%

Interestingly, US Small Cap value firm Royce had built up a 3.9% stake end of last year, I guess they are not that happy now.

The stock price has been punished quite severely over the last months:

One can also see the different stages of hope and despair, especially in the last few weeks. I haven’t looked too closely at the company yet, but in my Boss model, the stock doesn’t look that bad. Interestingly, if one looks at the balance sheet, one might think that debt should not be such a problem, although they do have pension liabilities as well.

So for the time being no action, but an interesting candidate for my “deeply discounted rights issue” research.

Royal Imtech update: Higher loss & Rights issue

After last qeek’s first look at Royal Imtech, Imtech came out today with a press release:

The highlights were as follows:

Rights issue will be completely used for debt reduction
Measures to make financial structure more robust
Write-off of 150 million euro for Polish projects
Write-off of 150 million euro for German projects

So this means that the write offs are a lot higher than initially communciated. Back then, they only said “100 mn EUR in Poland”, now we are at 300 mn EUR in Poland and Germany.

In parallel they also reported a change in the CEO positon:

Gouda, the Netherlands – The Supervisory Board of Royal Imtech N.V. (IM-AE, technical services provision within and outside Europe) confirms that in good consultation and in line with the original plan, René van der Bruggen (65) has decided to retire as of 3 April 2013. He will remain a member of the Board of Management until 3 April. He will hand over as Chairman with immediate effect. Gerard van de Aast (55), who is already a member of the Board of Management, is as of now appointed CEO of Royal Imtech and Chairman of the Board of Management

So this could be an interesiting situation. The new CEO will most likely go for a “kitchen sink” approach and write off as much as possible in order to have some “cushion” in the future.

Another aspect is what they say in the first press release:

Royal Imtech N.V. (IM-AE, technical services provider in and outside Europe) announces that the company will strengthen its equity through a rights issue of 500 million euro. The proceeds of the rights issue will be completely used for debt reduction. As a result of this the balance sheet of Imtech will be reinforced

This looks like that the banks have Imtech “by the balls” and could push through the rights issue in their interest. So it is not really a surprise that the share price of Imtech dropped to a new low:

Again, as in the KPN case I would wait until the details of the rights issue are known. With a current market cap of 800 mn EUR, a 500 mn EUR rights issue will require a significant discount.

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